The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #121 (March 6, 2016)

    • New York Times
    • 03/03/16

    In honor of Women’s History Month, we asked our spring Student Council — 25 teenagers from all over the United States, as well as from China, South Korea, England and Canada — to search the Times and find the most interesting pieces they could on the broad topic of gender… They unearthed everything from a 1911 report on the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire and a 1972 Times review of “Free to Be … You and Me” to current articles, videos and essays on Hillary Clinton, campus rape debates, gender pronouns, abortion, Title IX, parenting, and the struggles of the transgender community.”

    • Atlantic
    • 02/27/16

    These kids almost certainly don't need to spend any more time talking to classmates about what sets them apart from the world around them. They need to have as many experiences as possible outside the privileged halls of their schools… They need to discover not just what makes them different, but what they share in common, and what they can learn from individuals who've taken different paths through life.”

    • Miami Herald
    • 02/24/16

    “If it becomes law, the computer-coding measure — which would take effect in the 2018-19 school year — would be the first of its kind in the country… But critics of the proposal worry it could dilute students’ cultural education and place a burden on public schools that already lack adequate technology resources.”

ATHENA

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CURRICULUM

LEADERSHIP

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STEM

TECH

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Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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