The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #200 (September 10, 2017)

    • Chronicle of Higher Education
    • 09/06/17

    The curriculum changes, hammered out in just three months by the college’s faculty, will abolish traditional academic departments and instead align professors in three groups, one focusing on engineering, science, and technology, another on the environment and sustainability, and the third on creativity and the arts.”

    • Education Dive
    • 09/01/17

    This past fall, Miami University became the first Division 1 school to have a varsity e-sports team, and Platt said a game last semester had more streaming viewers the school’s football, basketball and hockey matches throughout the entire year. The Guardian even reports the possibility that e-sports will be included in the 2024 Paris Olympics… There are about 40 schools with varsity teams throughout the country, according to Platt, and many are offering scholarships. While some are thousands of dollars — others, like the University of Utah, are offering full ride scholarships to talented gamers.”

ADOLESCENCE

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

    • Quartz
    • 09/04/17

    Since there are no teachers, it is up to students to figure things out. Everything is graded by peers. Students “manage their time how they want,” says Sadirac. “It’s totally self organized.” In education-speak, École 42 is both project-based learning and peer-to-peer learning, on steroids.”

HUMANITIES

LEARNING SCIENCE

MINDFULNESS

PEDAGOGY

STEM

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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