The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #213 (December 10, 2017)

    • Atlantic
    • 12/02/17

    In ancient Athens, isegoria described the equal right of citizens to participate in public debate in the democratic assembly; parrhesia, the license to say what one pleased, how and when one pleased, and to whom.”

    • Harvard
    • 01/01/15

    We offer a strand-by-strand overview of our developing work, and conclude by presenting the “big take away” from our research and by making suggestions for policymakers, educators, and other stakeholders. Along the way, we identify what we consider to be the most salient benefits of maker-centered learning for young people and, introduce some of the key concepts and resources that have emerged from our work… The most salient benefits of maker-centered learning for young people have to do with developing a sense of self and a sense of community.”

ADMISSIONS

ADOLESCENCE

ATHLETICS

    • Star Tribune
    • 12/06/17

    Researchers found that students who were physically fit were much more likely to score better on state standardized tests. They were 27 percent more likely to be proficient in math and 24 percent more likely to be proficient in reading.”

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

    • Harvard Magazine
    • 12/05/17

    The final clubs in particular are a product of another era, a time when Harvard’s student body was all male, culturally homogenous, and overwhelmingly white and affluent. Our student body today is significantly different. While we should respect tradition, it is incumbent on us to organize the institution for the benefit of our current students and those who will follow. …at least as an initial step, we should proceed in such a way as to give students both choice and agency in bringing about changes to the campus culture.”

HIGHER ED

    • Atlantic
    • 01/01/18

    “I’m cynical about students. The vast majority are philistines. I’m cynical about teachers. The vast majority are uninspiring. I’m cynical about “deciders”—the school officials who control what students study. The vast majority think they’ve done their job as long as students comply.”

LEADERSHIP

LEARNING SCIENCE

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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