The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #214 (December 17, 2017)

    • CNN
    • 12/12/17

    A 2008 study found that sustained intense interests, particularly in a conceptual domain like dinosaurs, can help children develop increased knowledge and persistence, a better attention span, and deeper information-processing skills.”

    • Long View On Education
    • 12/10/17

    But as Kate Lacey notes, active/passive does not work as a simple binary, but as a fractal distinction, where what counts as ‘active’ shifts with context: listening is active in contrast to hearing, but listening counts as passive in relation to speaking, and both listening and speaking count as passive in relation to movement.”

ADOLESCENCE

ASSESSMENT

ATHENA

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

EARLY CHILDHOOD

    • New York Times
    • 12/14/17

    It’s not just that the Tulsa preschoolers were ahead of their peers academically when they got to kindergarten… When the researchers used the Tulsa data to project the impact of the program into adulthood, they concluded that because of those youngsters’ higher projected income and diminished likelihood of incarceration, every dollar invested in quality preschool could generate a two-dollar return.”

    • New York Times
    • 12/14/17

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

    • Medium
    • 12/11/17

    It is our mission as English teachers to teach writing as a method of thinking, to re-mediate their writing for current and future circumstances and technologies, and to help our students find a sense of agency and empowerment in the act of writing.”

STEM

TECH

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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