The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #229 (April 1, 2018)

ADMISSIONS

ADOLESCENCE

ATHENA

ATHLETICS

    • NPR
    • 03/30/18

    “He stopped one shot after another — seven times blocking the Jets' attempts to score. In a moment most rec-league players can recognize from our wildest dreams, the fans in the United Center began chanting his name.”

CHARACTER

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PD

    • Gallup
    • 03/27/18

    “The primary reason teachers gave for leaving their last job was career advancement or development, with 60% of teachers who left voluntarily citing reasons related to this category.”

    • New York Times
    • 03/26/18

    “Why do we react this way to feedback that is ostensibly supposed to help us? Essentially, it’s because all of us are so awful at delivering negative feedback. It’s a self-reinforcing vicious circle that trains us to avoid what would make us better at work and in life.”

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

    • The Millions
    • 03/19/18

    “I sat in the dark staring at my laptop. I was well into my second hour of watching sword fights on YouTube. I switched between samurai movies, anime, medieval battle scenes, and pirate duels. Two of my students just kept writing about sword fights, and I was trying to be a better teacher. If I was going to critique the battle scenes in their novels-in-progress, I needed to understand what made a good sword fight.”

SOCIAL MEDIA

STEM

    • KQED
    • 03/18/18

    “What I appreciated most is how humanizing our conversations were of mathematics — in terms of who was doing it — and how much curiosity students brought to the mathematical ideas they were exposed to.”

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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