The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #234 (May 6, 2018)

    • Aeon
    • 04/24/18

    The source of the trouble is that when people are judged by performance metrics they are incentivised to do what the metrics measure, and what the metrics measure will be some established goal. But that impedes innovation, which means doing something not yet established, indeed that hasn’t even been tried out. Innovation involves experimentation. And experimentation includes the possibility, perhaps probability, of failure. At the same time, rewarding individuals for measured performance diminishes a sense of common purpose, as well as the social relationships that motivate co-operation and effectiveness. Instead, such rewards promote competition.”

ADMISSIONS

ADOLESCENCE

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

    • Inside Higher Ed
    • 05/02/18

    “In 2014, it modified degree requirements to mandate that all students complete an internship, study-abroad trip or guided research project… Late last month, [the President] told students and faculty members that she envisions Hiram’s academics as being organized around five interdisciplinary schools… Not to be accused of technophilia, it has also given each student a pair of high-end hiking boots to encourage them to get out of dorm rooms and explore their surroundings.”

    • EdSurge
    • 05/01/18

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

TECH

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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