The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #239 (June 10, 2018)

    • Transcend Education
    • 05/31/18

    “Whether you are designing a completely new learning model or updating your approach as part of ongoing efforts to learn and improve, identifying the outcomes that learners will achieve as a result of their time with you [is a] critical step.”

    • Hechinger Report
    • 05/21/18

    In surveys, specialized teachers said they were less able to tailor instruction for each child (advocates of personalized learning, take note!) and they were much less likely to report an increase in job satisfaction or performance than elementary school teachers who spent all day with their students. It seems that the ostensible benefits of specialization were outweighed by the fact teachers had fewer interactions with each student.”

ATHENA

CHARACTER

    • New York Times
    • 06/06/18
    • Medium
    • 03/23/18

    “For decades, psychological research has been able to explain procrastination as a functioning problem, not a consequence of laziness. When a person fails to begin a project that they care about, it’s typically due to either a) anxiety about their attempts not being “good enough” or b) confusion about what the first steps of the task are. Not laziness. In fact, procrastination is more likely when the task is meaningful and the individual cares about doing it well.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SAFETY

STEM

    • Medium
    • 05/30/18

    The Gandalf days of my career are still sharp in my mind. I enrolled in AP Computer Science in August 2012, the same year I would apply for college. It was in AP CS that I wrote my first lines of code. And, in the beginning, I struggled with everything.”

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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