The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #244 (July 15, 2018)

    • New Yorker
    • 07/09/18

    “I was going through a tough time, and watching his streams gave me an outlet outside of reality where I could just smile and not think about my problems.”

    • Principal Center
    • 01/05/18

    Reflexive feedback conversations involve both parties in talking, listening, reflecting, and taking action. The idea of reflexivity, which comes from the social sciences, suggests a two-way street—a feedback relationship that runs in both directions. Leaders who use reflexive feedback are more effective at changing teacher practice because they're willing and able change things other than the teacher, in order to support positive changes in the teacher’s practice.

ATHENA

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

    • New York Times
    • 07/10/18

    “Researchers have found that certain health behaviors appear to be contagious and that our social networks — in person and online — can influence obesity, anxiety and overall happiness. A recent report found that a person’s exercise routine was strongly influenced by his or her social network.”

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

HIGHER ED

    • New Yorker
    • 07/02/18

    These aren’t easy problems… But I don’t think it’s beyond us to say, on the one hand, that everyone has a right to express their views, and, on the other hand, that a political provocateur may not use a university campus as his personal playground, especially if it bankrupts the university. At some point, when some enormous amount of money has been spent, it has to be possible to say, O.K. Enough.”

HUMANITIES

STEM

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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