The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #249 (August 19, 2018)

    • New York Times
    • 08/11/18

    “Years ago I spoke with a 16-year-old girl who was considering the idea of having a computer companion in the future, and she described the upside to me. It’s not that the robot she’d imagined, a vastly more sophisticated Siri, was so inspiring. It’s that she’d already found people to be so disappointing. And now, for the first time, she explained me, people have options. Back then I thought her comments seemed prescient. Now I find them timely.”

    • ASCD
    • 08/01/18

    We make countless choices to change how we interact with our job. Each of these choices influences how we feel about teaching. Psychologists call these choices job crafting. Job crafting, say psychologists Amy Wrzesniewski and Jane E. Dutton, is the actions employees take to redesign their work in order to foster engagement, satisfaction, resilience, and thriving. This means being intentional about how we engage with the tasks, people, and purpose that compose our careers.”

ADOLESCENCE

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

EARLY CHILDHOOD

    • New York Times
    • 08/18/18

    “Children who help more at home feel a larger sense of obligation and connectedness to their parents, and that connection helps them weather life’s stressful moments — in other words, it helps them be happier.”

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PD

READING/WRITING

SOCIAL MEDIA

TECH

VISUAL DESIGN

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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