The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #263 (November 25, 2018)

    • NPR
    • 11/22/18

    “Every year since 2010, the National Association of Scholars surveys the schools that pick books. This year, throughout 481 colleges and universities, they found schools were more likely to pick new books over classics. 67 percent of common reading books assigned were published after 2011, according to NAS.”

    • Paris Review
    • 11/15/18

    “Puns point to the essence of all true wit—the ability to hold in the mind two different ideas about the same thing at the same time. And the pun’s primacy is demonstrated by its strategic use in the oldest sacred stories, texts, and myths.”

ASSESSMENT

    • Hechinger Report
    • 11/16/18

    “We do have a little bit of a Wild West situation right now with alternative credentials,” said Alana Dunagan… Thousands of credentials classes aimed at improving specific skills have cropped up outside of traditional colleges. Some classes are boot camps, including those popular with computer coders. Others are even more narrowly focused, such as courses on factory automation and breastfeeding. Colleges and universities have responded by adding non-degree programs of their own.”

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

    • Washington Post
    • 11/22/18

    “Walter Isaacson: Schools should be nurturing curiosity… Ken Burns: respect people with different opinions… Sophia Rosenfeld: I would try to teach students something about the nature and history of truth.”

    • Americans for the Arts
    • 11/19/18

    “It is based on a nationally representative sample of 3,023 American adults, making it one of the largest public opinion studies about the arts ever conducted.  As one might expect when hearing from the public, we find a mix of assumptions challenged and observations confirmed.”

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

PEDAGOGY

STEM

TECH

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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