The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #289 (June 2, 2019)

    • Quartz
    • 05/25/19

    “Walking is a way to be more present, ease anxiety, spark creativity, increase productivity, and detox from digital overload (that is, if you don’t walk with your face in your phone).”

    • New York Times
    • 05/24/19

    “This pattern extends beyond music and sports. Students who have to specialize earlier in their education — picking a pre-med or law track while still in high school — have higher earnings than their generalist peers at first, according to one economist’s research in several countries. But the later-specializing peers soon caught up… The early specializers, meanwhile, more often quit their career tracks.”

ADOLESCENCE

    • New York Times
    • 05/21/19

    “Include psychological abuse, and these numbers rise significantly. More than 60 percent of adolescents who date (both boys and girls) said they had experienced physical, sexual or psychological abuse from a partner.”

ATHENA

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

CURRICULUM

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

LEARNING SCIENCE

PD

    • TES
    • 05/30/19

    “Classrooms are just too complicated for research ever to tell teachers what to do. Teachers need to know about research, to be sure, so that they can make smarter decisions about where to invest their time, but teachers, and school leaders need to become critical consumers of research – using research evidence where it is available and relevant, but also recognising that there are many things teachers need to make decisions about where there is no research evidence, and also realising that sometimes the research that is available may not be applicable in a particular context.”

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

TECH

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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