The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #299 (August 11, 2019)

    • Inside Higher Ed
    • 08/08/19

    “Whether higher ed can overcome the barriers to institutional and departmental collaboration is, to my mind, the next great challenge facing our colleges and universities.”

    • NPR
    • 08/02/19

    “Can changing how you think about stress make you healthier? And here, the science says yes. When you change your mind about stress, you can change your body's response to stress. Your heart might be pounding. You might be breathing faster, maybe breaking out into a sweat. And normally, we interpret these physical changes as anxiety or signs that we aren't coping very well with the pressure… Participants who learned to view the stress response as helpful for their performance – well, they were less stressed out, less anxious, more confident. But the most fascinating finding to me was how their physical stress response changed.”

ADMISSIONS

ARTS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SOCIAL MEDIA

STEM

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

WORKPLACE

    • US News & World Report
    • 08/05/19
    • Literary Review
    • 08/01/19

    “The authors find little proof of increasing busyness among the population. Yes, as expected, people were spending far more time on digital devices in 2015 than they were in 2000. But the data provides little evidence that people now spend more time multitasking or that they’re switching more often from one activity to another, which might make our time seem fragmented and frantic. The perception that we’re all super busy might have grown, the authors say, because of the way that certain subgroups of the population who have seen an increase in their workloads – those who are highly educated, in higher-status jobs and in dual-career households with small children – are more likely to have an influential voice in society and the media and so might have helped to create an impression that everyone is now busier.”

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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