The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #327 (March 8, 2020)

    • Hechinger Report
    • 03/02/20

    “The researchers compared siblings who attended different high schools, and the ones who attended schools that were better at boosting soft skills had better outcomes.”

    • New Yorker
    • 03/02/20

    “We are all embedded within systems, but each life—each child—is an unrepeatable anecdote. According to the adults I knew when I was a kid, the worst thing in the world was to be a “statistic,” subsumed into a mass of low expectations and bad outcomes determined by color and class and sustained by a bureaucracy that was, at best, inept and, at worst, intractably racist. Education, then, was triage; escape was a higher-order concern than reform. Parents murmured about how So-and-So had got her daughter into Such-and-Such school, and had spirited the kid away from a school system whose failures symbolized—and, in many ways, flowed out of—a larger set of brutal social facts.”

ASSESSMENT

ATHENA

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

    • EdWeek
    • 03/03/20

    “Teens who have a decent night's sleep are better equipped to deal with stress the next day, including seeking out support from friends and engaging in active problem solving rather than brooding.”

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SAFETY

STEM

TECH

VISUAL DESIGN

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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