The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #339 (July 19, 2020)

    • Cult of Pedagogy
    • 07/05/20

    “I asked Melanie to share some ways online teaching should be different from face-to-face teaching. She came up with nine: three that are specific to community building and communication, and six that focus on instructional design. Along with these differences, she also shared a few things that should stay exactly the same.”

    • Hechinger Report
    • 06/19/20

    “That’s why both educators and researchers who study child development say the school shutdowns resulting from the coronavirus pandemic may be particularly disruptive for middle schoolers. These kids are being sequestered at home at exactly the stage in life they need their peers and teachers most.”

ADOLESCENCE

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

    • New York Times
    • 07/11/20
    • EdSurge
    • 06/19/20

    “What most participants took away from the 90-minute forums, though, was just how complicated the problem is, he said, noting: “It’s like picking what’s the best of a lot of not very attractive options.” …In the end, no plan will make everyone happy. But Goldberg predicts that people who participated in the forums will at least have a better understanding of the problem, and the process that went into the plan. “This community, I think they’re just going to respond better because they’ve been consulted,” he said.”

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SOCIAL MEDIA

STEM

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

Subscribe

* indicates required