The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #344 (September 6, 2020)

    • New York Times
    • 09/02/20

    “The theory: To deal effectively with change, it helps to be engaged in changing yourself.”

    • EdWeek
    • 08/30/20

    “In other words, instead of changing the assessment context or altering the severity of consequences, teachers simply take away students' reasons for cheating. Why cheat on an assessment if that hurts your chances of getting the individualized assistance you need to do well? Some teachers go so far as to make every assessment formative until students get it, and only then do they consider results for summative purposes related to accountability and grading.”

ASSESSMENT

CREATIVITY

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

LEADERSHIP

READING/WRITING

STEM

TECH

VISUAL DESIGN

Z-OTHER

    • Atlantic
    • 10/01/20

    “Calamity forces people to ask fundamental questions: What is a community for? How is it put together? What are its basic needs? How should we provide them?”

    • Atlas Obscura
    • 05/04/18

    “The walls weren’t built in the forest but in and around farms. By the middle of the 19th century, New England was over 70 percent deforested by settlers, a rolling landscape of smallholdings as far as the eye could see. But by the end of the century, industrialization and large-scale farms led to thousands of fields being abandoned, to begin a slow process of reforestation.”

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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