The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #362 (May 30, 2021)

ADMISSIONS

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

    • Character Lab
    • 05/23/21

    “When we fail, we tune out. To avoid feeling bad about ourselves, we stop paying attention. As a result, we don’t learn from the experience. We do learn when failure is less personal. In our research, participants who struggled to learn from their own failures were able to learn from the failures of others. It can be hard to focus on our own failings, but the mistakes, recoveries, and hard-won lessons of friends and colleagues? Those are some teachable moments. Don’t magnify mistakes… Do spotlight success.”

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

    • KQED
    • 05/28/21

    “In reality, the bills many Republicans have proposed do not directly address critical race theory. Instead, many ban the teaching of concepts that educators say they don't teach anyway. A bill signed into law by Oklahoma governor Kevin Stitt bans lessons that include the concept that one race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex, that a person's moral character is inherently determined by his or her race or sex, or that someone should feel discomfort, guilt or distress on account of their race or sex. Nonetheless, educators say the newly adopted and proposed laws are already forcing teachers to second guess whether they can lead students in conversations about race and structural racism that many feel are critical at a time the nation is navigating an important reckoning on those issues.”

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SOCIAL MEDIA

STEM

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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