The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #383 (June 24, 2022)

    • New Yorker
    • 06/21/22

    “Dan pressed a button, and in less than a second the computer produced a poem in the style of Philip Larkin that was so much like a Philip Larkin poem, we thought it was a poem by Philip Larkin. We Googled the first line, expecting it to be an existing Philip Larkin poem, but we couldn’t find it on the Internet. It was an original work, composed by the A.I. in less time than it takes a man to sneeze.”

    • TED
    • 08/30/17

    “To find your people, you have to know how to signal your passions and interests and seek out theirs. But you can also search Google, or scan LinkedIn profiles and send “Connect with Me” notices. You can tweet links about what you’re interested in, or leave comments on an Instagram feed. Here is a brief taxonomy that identifies five different types of communities you can tap into.”

ADOLESCENCE

ARTS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

HEALTH

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LEADERSHIP

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

STEM

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

    • New York Times
    • 06/21/22

    “China’s ambition to collect a staggering amount of personal data from everyday citizens is more expansive than previously known, a Times investigation has found. Phone-tracking devices are now everywhere. The police are creating some of the largest DNA databases in the world. And the authorities are building upon facial recognition technology to collect voice prints from the general public. The Times’s Visual Investigations team and reporters in Asia spent over a year analyzing more than a hundred thousand government bidding documents… Here are the investigation’s major revelations.”

    • MIT
    • 06/21/22
    • Harvard Business Review
    • 05/16/22

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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