The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #395 (September 25, 2022)

    • Gallup
    • 09/22/22

    “Here are a few of the discoveries that are truly compelling: People who love their jobs do not hate Mondays. Education-related debt can cause an emotional scar that remains even after you pay off the debt. Volunteering is not just good for the people you are helping; it is also good for you. Exercising is better at eliminating fatigue than prescription drugs. Loneliness can double your risk of dying from heart disease. Using all these insights from across the industry combined with our surveys and analysis, we created the five elements of wellbeing. And our ongoing global research confirms that the five elements of wellbeing are significant drivers of a great life everywhere.”

    • New York Times
    • 09/21/22

    “Mrs. Bailey did more than tell us we could do it. She was not mere sunshine and encouragement. She forced us to have opinions and defend them. And she was not alone. She was part of a cadre of teachers known for genuinely trying to get us to engage with the material and ourselves. Mr. Crump had us fumbling around in Plato’s cave. Mrs. Carter taught us the art of stringing sentences together and making coherent arguments. Mrs. Miller introduced us to literature that posed the ultimate questions… Great teachers force us to wrestle with questions that have plagued philosophers, politicians, religious leaders, poets and scribes for millenniums.”

ADMISSIONS

ADOLESCENCE

ASSESSMENT

ATHLETICS

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HEALTH

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

PEDAGOGY

STEM

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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