The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #405 (January 29, 2023)

    • EdWeek
    • 01/19/23

    “30 percent of the roughly 1,000 teenagers surveyed by the EdWeek Research Center last fall said they wanted to learn more about job opportunities related to sustainability and climate change.”

    • Stephen Wolfram
    • 01/09/23

    “For decades there’s been a dichotomy in thinking about AI between “statistical approaches” of the kind ChatGPT uses, and “symbolic approaches” that are in effect the starting point for Wolfram|Alpha. But now—thanks to the success of ChatGPT—as well as all the work we’ve done in making Wolfram|Alpha understand natural language—there’s finally the opportunity to combine these to make something much stronger than either could ever achieve on their own.”

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HEALTH

HIGHER ED

LEADERSHIP

    • Edutopia
    • 01/26/23
    • MIT Sloan Management Review
    • 01/25/23
    • Gallup
    • 12/16/22

    “Beyond having an engaged workforce generally, what else can organizational leaders do to help? Gallup sought to identify the most salient aspects of work life that relate to mental health.  Nearly 50 individual metrics were analyzed to distill the most common and highest return-on-investment actions that result in a positive impact on employee mental health. In each case, employees who strongly agree with these five statements are at least seven times more likely to report that their job had an extremely positive impact on their mental health in the prior six months, resulting in what we’ve identified as the top five pillars of employee mental health.”

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SAFETY

STEM

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

VISUAL DESIGN

WORKPLACE

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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