The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Educator’s Notebook #409 (March 5, 2023)

    • New Yorker
    • 03/06/23

    ““Imagine if you had a voice assistant that could write code for you, and you said, ‘Hey, Alexa, build me a Web site to sell shoes,’ ” Sanjay Sarma, a professor of mechanical engineering at M.I.T., told me on the phone. “That’s already happening. It’s called ‘low-code.’ ” There has been much hand-wringing about ChatGPT and its ability to replicate some composition tasks. But ChatGPT can no more conceive “Mrs. Dalloway” than it can guide and people-manage an organization. Instead, A.I. can gather and order information, design experiments and processes, produce descriptive writing and mediocre craftwork, and compose basic code, and those are the careers likeliest to go into slow eclipse. “I think the future belongs to the humanities,” Sarma said.”

    • Henri’s Math Ed Blog
    • 08/28/19

    “Different opinions reflect different values, different attitudes towards assessment, and different understandings of how learning happens. I’ll take a stab at unpacking this, and (as is my wont) I will not be shy about sharing my opinions along the way. I will present this as a discussion with imaginary colleagues, whose contributions are in bold type. “

ADMISSIONS

ARTS

ATHENA

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

ELEMENTARY

HEALTH

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

MINDFULNESS

PD

PEDAGOGY

SOCIAL MEDIA

TECH

WORKPLACE

Z-OTHER

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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