The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Tag: athletics

    • HealthDay
    • 03/15/23
    “The researchers found that high school athletic trainers reported 15,531 injuries over 6,778,209 athletic exposures (AEs; practice or competition), yielding an estimated 5.2 million injuries nationally. Football (3.96 per AE), girls’ soccer (2.65), and boys’ wrestling (2.36) had the highest injury rates, with injury rates overall higher in boys’ sports (2.52) versus girls’ sports (1.56). […]
    • New York Times
    • 10/17/19
    “The six N.A.T.A. recommendations are endorsed by five societies of athletic trainers, including professional football, hockey, soccer, basketball and baseball trainers, as well as the group’s Intercollegiate Council for Sports Medicine.”
    • Quartz
    • 09/11/19
    “In 2018, 141 US colleges and universities offered varsity esports programs, 75 more than in 2017.”
    • Quartz
    • 05/25/19
    “Walking is a way to be more present, ease anxiety, spark creativity, increase productivity, and detox from digital overload (that is, if you don’t walk with your face in your phone).”
    • Harvard Education Review
    • 06/19/18
    “In this essay, ethicists… argue that the US public schools’ sponsorship of tackle football is ethically indefensible and inconsistent with their educational aims. Their argument relies on three ethical principles and a growing body of evidence that many students who play football suffer traumatic brain injury and cognitive impairment that undermine their academic success and […]
    • Education Dive
    • 09/01/17
    This past fall, Miami University became the first Division 1 school to have a varsity e-sports team, and Platt said a game last semester had more streaming viewers the school’s football, basketball and hockey matches throughout the entire year. The Guardian even reports the possibility that e-sports will be included in the 2024 Paris Olympics… […]
    • HealthDay
    • 03/15/23
    “The researchers found that high school athletic trainers reported 15,531 injuries over 6,778,209 athletic exposures (AEs; practice or competition), yielding an estimated 5.2 million injuries nationally. Football (3.96 per AE), girls’ soccer (2.65), and boys’ wrestling (2.36) had the highest injury rates, with injury rates overall higher in boys’ sports (2.52) versus girls’ sports (1.56). […]
    • New York Times
    • 10/17/19
    “The six N.A.T.A. recommendations are endorsed by five societies of athletic trainers, including professional football, hockey, soccer, basketball and baseball trainers, as well as the group’s Intercollegiate Council for Sports Medicine.”
    • Quartz
    • 09/11/19
    “In 2018, 141 US colleges and universities offered varsity esports programs, 75 more than in 2017.”
    • Quartz
    • 05/25/19
    “Walking is a way to be more present, ease anxiety, spark creativity, increase productivity, and detox from digital overload (that is, if you don’t walk with your face in your phone).”
    • Harvard Education Review
    • 06/19/18
    “In this essay, ethicists… argue that the US public schools’ sponsorship of tackle football is ethically indefensible and inconsistent with their educational aims. Their argument relies on three ethical principles and a growing body of evidence that many students who play football suffer traumatic brain injury and cognitive impairment that undermine their academic success and […]
    • Education Dive
    • 09/01/17
    This past fall, Miami University became the first Division 1 school to have a varsity e-sports team, and Platt said a game last semester had more streaming viewers the school’s football, basketball and hockey matches throughout the entire year. The Guardian even reports the possibility that e-sports will be included in the 2024 Paris Olympics… […]

ADMISSIONS

ADOLESCENCE

ATHLETICS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HEALTH

PEDAGOGY

STEM

TECH

    • NPR
    • 01/24/20
    “Today, more than 170 colleges and universities participate. And there’s money on the table — more than $16 million in college scholarships. Naturally, high schools have followed suit.”

Z-OTHER

GENERAL

    • HealthDay
    • 03/15/23
    “The researchers found that high school athletic trainers reported 15,531 injuries over 6,778,209 athletic exposures (AEs; practice or competition), yielding an estimated 5.2 million injuries nationally. Football (3.96 per AE), girls’ soccer (2.65), and boys’ wrestling (2.36) had the highest injury rates, with injury rates overall higher in boys’ sports (2.52) versus girls’ sports (1.56). […]
    • New York Times
    • 10/17/19
    “The six N.A.T.A. recommendations are endorsed by five societies of athletic trainers, including professional football, hockey, soccer, basketball and baseball trainers, as well as the group’s Intercollegiate Council for Sports Medicine.”
    • Quartz
    • 09/11/19
    “In 2018, 141 US colleges and universities offered varsity esports programs, 75 more than in 2017.”
    • Quartz
    • 05/25/19
    “Walking is a way to be more present, ease anxiety, spark creativity, increase productivity, and detox from digital overload (that is, if you don’t walk with your face in your phone).”
    • Harvard Education Review
    • 06/19/18
    “In this essay, ethicists… argue that the US public schools’ sponsorship of tackle football is ethically indefensible and inconsistent with their educational aims. Their argument relies on three ethical principles and a growing body of evidence that many students who play football suffer traumatic brain injury and cognitive impairment that undermine their academic success and […]
    • Education Dive
    • 09/01/17
    This past fall, Miami University became the first Division 1 school to have a varsity e-sports team, and Platt said a game last semester had more streaming viewers the school’s football, basketball and hockey matches throughout the entire year. The Guardian even reports the possibility that e-sports will be included in the 2024 Paris Olympics… […]

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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