The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Topic: curriculum

ADOLESCENCE

AI

    • Myra Roldan
    • 07/23/23
    “AI systems are taking on repetitive, physically demanding, or hazardous roles, allowing human workers to engage in more intricate tasks — this is where the term “blue-collar AI” comes in, these are roles that do not require the individual to have deep data science skills, be a researcher, or to build complex algorithms. “Blue-collar AI” […]
    • New York Times
    • 06/02/23
    ““Programming will be obsolete,” Matt Welsh, a former engineer at Google and Apple, predicted recently… Welsh’s argument, which ran earlier this year in the house organ of the Association for Computing Machinery, carried the headline, “The End of Programming,” but there’s also a way in which A.I. could mark the beginning of a new kind […]

ARTS

ASSESSMENT

ATHENA

BEST

CHARACTER

CODING

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

DISCUSSION

    • Atlantic
    • 12/22/13
    “Conversations are messy–full of pauses and interruptions and topic changes and assorted awkwardness. But the messiness is what allows for true exchange. It gives participants the time–and, just as important, the permission–to think and react and glean insights.”

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

PEDAGOGY

READING/WRITING

SELECT

STEM

SUSTAINABILITY

TECH

TECHNOLOGY

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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