The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Topic: humanities

    • College Board
    • 12/06/23
    “Since 2022, nearly 15,000 students and hundreds of teachers in more than 40 states have helped pilot AP African American Studies. (The course will be available nationally in the 2024-25 school year.) College Board visited some of them, in Baltimore, Houston, and Baton Rouge, to see the course in action—and to hear directly from those […]

ADOLESCENCE

AI

    • Res Obscura
    • 09/12/23
    “In the second half of this post, I go into detail about what exactly I mean by “simulating history.” I am under no illusions that these simulations are accurate: they are littered with confidently-stated falsehoods and hallucinations. Sometimes, though, hallucinations can be a feature, not a bug.”
    • New York Times
    • 07/25/23
    “We have now arrived at a similar crossroads in the science of computing, a crossroads that connects engineering and ethics, where we will again have to choose whether to proceed with the development of a technology whose power and potential we do not yet fully apprehend… It was the raw power and strategic potential of […]
    • New York Times
    • 06/30/23
    “But human intelligence is as much a product of policies and institutions as it is of genes and individual aptitudes. It’s easier to be smart on a fellowship in the Library of Congress than while working several jobs in a place without a bookstore or even decent Wi-Fi. It doesn’t seem all that controversial to […]

ASSESSMENT

ATHENA

BEST

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CREATIVITY

    • New York Times
    • 07/01/23
    “A written constitution ratified by the people — and subject to amendment by the people — is an American invention. In the 18th century, people who drafted constitutions and commented on constitutionalism came to agree that if such a strange, new and fragile thing as a written constitution were to endure, it would, as time […]
    • New Yorker
    • 10/31/22
    “The garden of forking paths cannot continue to fork forever, if we are to find meaning there. Multiverses speak to the part of us that wants every option to be open, that wants the journey to go on and on. Of course, no journey really does—and at the end of many multiversal stories the tangle […]

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

ELEMENTARY

GRAMMAR

HIGHER ED

HUMANITIES

HUMANITIES GRAMMAR

INCLUSION

LANGUAGE

LESSONS

OTHER

PEDAGOGY

POETRY

READING

READING/WRITING

SELECT

SHAKESPEARE

SOCIAL MEDIA

STEM

TECH

TECHNOLOGY

VISUAL DESIGN

VISUALIZATION

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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