The Educator's Notebook

A weekly collection of education-related news from around the web.

Topic: reading/writing

    • Education Next
    • 04/03/24
    “Stories gain even more power when they are brought to life by reading aloud. In fact, this may be the book’s primary chance of salvation. If the book is going to survive its death struggle with the isolating and disconnecting technology of the smartphone, its best bet, I argue, will be if we can encourage […]
    • Research Gate
    • 10/01/23
    “In this meta-analysis, we examined if teaching writing improved the writing and reading of students in Grades 6 to 12, and what specific writing treatments enhanced students’ writing. Our review included writing treatments tested using an experimental or quasi-experimental design (with pretests) and published and unpublished studies, and computed effect sizes for all writing and […]

ADMISSIONS

    • New York Times
    • 08/02/17
    Here’s a tip: Choose a topic you really want to write about. If the subject doesn’t matter to you, it won’t matter to the reader. “

ADOLESCENCE

AI

ATHENA

BOOKS

CHARACTER

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COMMUNITY

CREATIVITY

CURRICULUM

DIVERSITY

DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

EARLY CHILDHOOD

ELEMENTARY

HIGHER ED

    • Chronicle of Higher Education
    • 02/22/23
    “For example, the editors of Science have decided that authors should not use text generated by ChatGPT in a submitted manuscript. Fair enough. But can authors use ChatGPT to generate an early outline for a manuscript? …What feels most different about ChatGPT compared to other assistive technologies is the possible reduction of intellectual labor. For most professors, writing — even […]
    • New York Times
    • 07/01/17
    Ohio State, the football-mad university of more than 60,000 students, could hardly be more different from Williams College, the prestigious liberal arts school in the Berkshires… But this summer, all of their incoming students received the same reading assignment”
    • LA Weekly
    • 02/20/14

HUMANITIES

HUMOR

    • McSweeney’s
    • 09/19/14
    Utterly contrived topic sentence revealing pretty much every flaw of structured essay writing. Therefore, supporting sentence invoking source that exists only in the bibliographies of other cited material (pp. arbitrary to arbitrary + 5). Contemplative question? Definitive refutation paraphrased from a blog found at 2AM.”

INTERNATIONAL

LANGUAGE

LEADERSHIP

OTHER

PD

PEDAGOGY

READING

READING/WRITING

SOCIAL MEDIA

    • New Statesman
    • 03/06/19
    “The quality varies, but there is plenty of comically or offensively banal work to be found on Instagram: genuinely insightful or distinctive work is the exception, not the rule. The same tropes and themes appear again and again: lower-case platitudes in typewriter fonts; earnest insistence of the importance of self-love; writing in the second person; […]
    • JStor
    • 02/20/18
    • Washington Post
    • 07/21/17
    The tyranny of the urgent crowds in around me. If I yield to that tyranny, my life fills with mental clutter. Boredom, say the researchers, is when creativity happens. A wandering mind wanders into new, unexpected places. When I retire to the mountains and unplug for a few days, something magical takes place. I’ll go […]

STEM

SUSTAINABILITY

    • Quartz
    • 12/12/19
    “Keeping the argument on track, and keeping it both civil and productive, is a key skill in critical thinking. It is helped by: making sure everyone is clear about what the point at issue actually is; bringing the conversation back to the point when it strays, or at least acknowledging that we are now talking […]

TECH

TECH/AI

TECH/AI: EDUCATION

TECH/AI: USES AND APPLICATIONS

    • New Republic
    • 04/22/24
    “But not very far into Baron’s Who Wrote This?, I realized I was being defensive—that I was arguing for a special exemption for writing and language because I consider them such immutable aspects of the mind, and of being human. Baron, with the dry eyes of an actuary, sets about deromanticizing writing.”

TECHNOLOGY

WORKPLACE

Issues

Every week I send out articles I encounter from around the web. Subject matter ranges from hard knowledge about teaching to research about creativity and cognitive science to stories from other industries that, by analogy, inform what we do as educators. This breadth helps us see our work in new ways.

Readers include teachers, school leaders, university overseers, conference organizers, think tank workers, startup founders, nonprofit leaders, and people who are simply interested in what’s happening in education. They say it helps them keep tabs on what matters most in the conversation surrounding schools, teaching, learning, and more.

Peter Nilsson

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